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  • Black Haw Bark

100% Certified organic Black Haw Bark

 

This bark, when boiled, can be used as a laxative, for intestinal cramps, menorrhagia, uterus inflammation, Braxton-Hick pain, cramping from miscarriage.  Studies have proven this bark to be helpful for swelling and cuts as the resin is slightly antiseptic.  Dosage is strong infusion 3-4 ounces to 4 times/day or tincture of 30-90 drops 4 times/day.

 

Black Haw is a deciduous shrub with serrated oval leaves, clusters of white flowers, and blue-black berries. It grows in woodlands in central and southern North America. It contains coumarins (inc. scopoletin and aesculetin), salicin, I-methly-2, 3dibtyl hemimellitate, viburnin, plant acids, and a trace of volatile oil, and tannin. The Catawba people used black haw to treat dysentery. It is antispasmodic and astringent, specifically useful for menstrual pain. It is also used for prolapsed uterus, heavy menopausal bleeding, morning sickness, and threatened miscarriage. Its antispasmodic properties are useful in cases of colic or other cramping pain that affects the bile ducts, digestive tract, or urinary tract. Those who are allergic to aspirin should not take black haw.

 

Andrew Chevallier. DK Publishing. (2016). Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine (3rd ed.). New York, NY. 281.

 

Moore,  Michael.  Herbal Materia Medica.  Southwest School of Botanical Medicine.  1995.  p29.

 

Moore, M. Specific Indications for Herbs in General Use. Southwest School of Botanical Medicine.  1997. p. 44.

 

Wallis, W. American Anthropologist..  Vol 24, issue 1, Oct 28, 2009.

 

 

 

 

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Black Haw Bark

  • Product Code: Bla520
  • Availability: In Stock
  • $3.60


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